Committed to Excellence

Conditions We Treat

  • Diabetes and Your Feet

    Diabetes is a systemic illness that can affect many different parts of the body. This is especially true for the feet. Proper foot screening is essential for diabetic patients, and any cut or sore should be taken very seriously.

  • Heel Spurs

    A heel spur is a bony protrusion that occurs on the heel. It is often confused with plantar fasciitis, which is inflammation of the plantar fascia ligament. When a heel spur is painful, it can make it quite difficult to walk.

  • Bunions

    A bunion is a bone deformity usually occurring at the base of the big toe. This is a progressive condition that is made worse by inward pressure from tight shoes. Bunions can be very painful, and in some instances, surgery may be necessary to remove them.

  • Athlete's Foot

    Athlete’s foot is a very common fungal infection that affects countless people around the world. It will manifest itself on the skin of the foot, in many cases in between the toes. Because fungi proliferates in warm, damp environments, keeping the feet clean and dry is of utmost importance in avoiding athlete’s foot.

  • Flat Feet

    Flat feet is a condition where the entire, or nearly entire, bottom of the foot meets the ground when standing. Depending on the severity, symptoms of flat feet can range from severe pain to non-existent.

  • Corns

    Corns and calluses are hard layers of skin that usually form due to friction. Generally, they will be in areas of the foot bearing weight or areas that frequently rub against the shoe. Soft corns are typically found between the toes.

  • Ankle Sprains

    Ankle sprains are very common injuries, with more than 3 million suffered each year in the US. They occur when the ligaments in the ankle are severely stretched or torn. Medical attention will be necessary to rule out a fracture, as often it is difficult to tell the full extent of the injury.

  • Hammertoes

    A hammertoe is characterized by one or more of the toes having a bend in the middle joint. This occurs because of the weakening of the muscle due to poorly fitted shoes or a genetically inherited trait.

IT'S ALL ABOUT WHAT'S BEST FOR YOU

Patient-Centered Care

We believe that effective medicine always begins with careful attention to each patient’s desires, concerns, and questions. Therefore, our philosophy is to provide effective, compassionate, and efficient care to each and every person who walks through our doors.

360° Health Approach

We want you to be healthy as a whole. At Wigley feet, you will receive invaluable information regarding nutrition, exercise, and all aspects surrounding your well-being. We have even created a spa to give you a place to relax and get pampered. Prevention and wellness are at the center of how we care for you.

Why Choose Wigley Feet?

• One-stop-foot-shop

• Board-certified physicians with advanced training

• In-house Surgical Center

• State-of-the-art facilities

• Warm atmosphere

• Friendly staff

5 Star Rating Across the Board

We offer advanced testing with state-of-the-art equipment

Achilles Tendon

The Achilles tendon is not only the strongest, but also the largest tendon in the human body. The main function of the Achilles tendon is to transmit power from the calf muscles to the heel and the foot.

It’s because of the Achilles tendon that we are able to stand on our toes when walking, running, or jumping. Even with all of its strength, the Achilles tendon can be exposed to injury. Due to its limited blood supply and the high tensions placed on it, the Achilles heel can be left vulnerable if harmed.

Possible conditions that may arise due to injury of the Achilles tendon include tears, ruptures, tendinitis, peritendinitis, tendinosis, tendinopathy, and bursitis. When trying to diagnose if one has issues with their Achilles tendon, a podiatrist will commonly check for any pain, swelling, or discoloration around the heel or lower leg area. Different treatments for issues concerning the Achilles tendon vary, but may include over-the-counter or prescribed pain relievers for intense discomfort, alternating ice and heat therapy, custom-made orthotics, physical therapy, and in severe cases, surgery. To help prevent injury to the Achilles tendon, it’s recommended to regularly perform stretches involving the muscles of the lower leg.

If you or someone you know is experiencing pain or discomfort involving the Achilles region, seek out the help of a podiatrist for a proper diagnosis and treatment regime.

Ankle Instability

CHRONIC LATERAL ANKLE PAIN

Chronic lateral ankle pain is recurring or chronic pain on the outside part of the ankle that often develops after an injury such as a sprained ankle.

Signs And Symptoms Include:

  • Ankle instability.
  • Difficulty walking on uneven ground or in high heels.
  • Pain, sometimes intense, on the outer side of the ankle.
  • Repeated ankle sprains.
  • Stiffness.
  • Swelling.
  • Tenderness.

Although Ankle Sprains Are The Most Common Cause Of Chronic Lateral Ankle Pain, Other Causes May Include:

  • A fracture in one of the bones that make up the ankle joint.
  • Arthritis of the ankle joint.
  • Inflammation of the joint lining.
  • Injury to the nerves that pass through the ankle. In this case, the nerves become stretched, torn, injured by a direct blow, or pinched under pressure.
  • Scar tissue in the ankle after a sprain. The scar tissue takes up space in the joint, putting pressure on the ligaments.
  • Torn or inflamed tendon.

Treatments For Chronic Lateral Ankle Pain Include:

  • Over the counter or prescription anti-inflammatory medications to reduce swelling. Note: Please consult your physician before taking any medications.
  • Physical therapy, including tilt-board exercises that focus on strengthening the muscles, restoring range of motion, and increasing your perception of joint position.
  • Ankle braces or other supports.
  • Steroid medication.
  • Immobilization to allow the bone to heal (in cases of fractures).
Ankle Pain

While initially thought of as an issue for athletes, can affect anyone at anytime. Simple, everyday activities, such as walking or running on an uneven surface, have the possibility of causing serious harm to one’s ankle. That is, however, not to discount athletic injuries; in fact, half of all ankle sprains are inflicted during an athletic activity. The most common causes of ankle injuries include tripping or falling, landing awkwardly after jumping, a sudden impact such as a car crash, or twisting, rolling, and rotating of the ankle.

Some signs that point to the potential of an ankle injury include pain towards the affected area, swelling, bruising, or an inability to walk or bear weight on the affected area. You may also notice an increase in the height of the arch of the inflicted foot. In order to understand why the injury occurred, a podiatrist will often question the patient about the events leading up to their ankle discomfort. An x-ray of the leg or foot may also be performed to discover what’s harming the ankle.

There are many different types of ankle injuries, such as ankle sprains, fractures, strains, and tendonitis. To relieve discomfort caused by these conditions, it’s recommended to get plenty of rest, use ice to reduce swelling and ease pain, compress the injured ankle by wrapping it for support, and elevate the ankle to reduce swelling.

If you or someone you know is experiencing pain or discomfort in the ankle region, seek out the help of a podiatrist for a proper diagnosis and treatment regime.

Ankle Sprains

Sprained ankles may occur when a person accidentally rolls, twists, or turns their ankle in an awkward way. When this occurs, ligaments in the ankle are being forced beyond their range of motion, thus causing an injury. Some symptoms that point to having a sprained ankle may include swelling, bruising, tenderness, and pain inflicted on the affected area. Some may also experience restricted range of motion or feel instability in the ankle.

There are many factors that play into the cause of ankle sprains. Simple, everyday activities like walking can lead to an ankle sprain if the activity is being done on an uneven surface. The same goes for running or exercising. Those who partake in sports may be more susceptible to obtaining a sprained ankle because they’re more likely to fall or land uncomfortably after a jump, which can lead to an injury.

It’s important to note that some of the main risk factors that can lead to sprained ankles are improper footwear, a prior ankle complication, weakness or lack of flexibility in the ankle region, and as mentioned above, uneven surfaces and involvement in sporting activities.
To better prevent an ankle sprain, it’s recommended to warm up before partaking in intense physical activities, use caution when walking or running on rough surfaces, consider using tape or wearing a brace on a previously injured ankle, and avoid frequently wearing footwear that puts tension on your ankles, like high heels.

In order to alleviate some discomfort caused by an ankle sprain, it’s recommended to get plenty of rest, try icing the affected area, keep the ankle elevated, and wrap or compress the ankle so it has little to no motion. For a professional diagnosis and information on treatments for a sprained ankle, consult with a podiatrist.

Arthritic Foot Care

Conditions affecting the feet due to complications with arthritis can take many forms, including osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis. Osteoarthritis typically affects the joint connecting your big toe to your foot, though it can also be found in the midfoot or ankle region. Unlike osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis typically affects both feet and deals with the same joints on each foot. Gout, which normally affects the big toe, is comprised of needle-like crystals that trigger inflammation in the joints. Psoriatic arthritis causes sausage-like swelling in the toes. Lastly, ankylosing spondylitis can lead to plantar fasciitis and pain at the Achilles tendon.

Many factors play a role in the cause for arthritic feet, including obesity, the aging process, as well as family history or genetic connections to arthritis.To help prevent issues with your feet, examine your feet daily, keep your feet clean, routinely moisturize your feet, keep your toenails trimmed, inspect your shoes for anything that may cause discomfort, and wear socks on a daily basis.

If you’re experiencing any discomfort or pain due to one of the above forms of arthritis, consider over-the-counter pain medication and investing in comfortable footwear. Pain medication coupled with top of the line comfort footwear is a great way to ease the pain that often comes with arthritis. If you’re overweight, it’s also recommended to think about setting a weight loss goal to ease some of the pressure on your feet, as well stay as active as possible. Applying ice or heat to the affected area is another way to calm the discomfort you may experience. It’s important to do research and see whether inserts may be beneficial for you. General foot care, like pampering your feet and keeping them well maintained, is also recommended. Lastly, you should seek professional advice and learn about potential surgery options, if necessary.

For an official diagnosis and information on treatment options, consult with a podiatrist.

Arthroscopy Foot/Ankle

Foot And Ankle Arthroscopy In Memphis And Torrance Areas

Injuries of the foot and ankle are frequently diagnosed with imaging during an examination by Dr. Stephen Wigley, our podiatrist in Miami, FL. Arthroscopy is a minimally invasive procedure used by Dr. Wigley to diagnose and treat injuries of the foot and ankle—it is to confirm the diagnosis. It can also be used to treat conditions within the joints, as long as they are not too complicated.

With the use of foot and ankle arthroscopy in Miami, Dr. Wigley can perform treatment on an outpatient basis. Through tiny incisions to the ankle and foot, arthroscopy offers an array of benefits compared to traditional surgery because of its minimally invasive nature, such as:

  • Shorter recovery times
  • Less bleeding and scarring
  • Smaller incisions
  • No cutting of muscles or tendons
  • Less pain and discomfort

Contact Dr. Stephen Wigley for more information on arthroscopy of the foot and ankle.

Athletes Foot

Athlete’s foot is a fungal infection that’s highly contagious and can be spread through direct skin to skin contact as well as indirect contact. Athlete’s foot can be spread directly when an uninfected person touches the infected area of someone who has athlete’s foot. The condition can be spread indirectly through contaminated surfaces, clothing, socks, shoes, bed sheets, and towels.

Areas that are known to be damp, warm, or humid are commonly known to be more susceptible to carrying the fungal infection. With that being said, you should use caution around swimming pools and communal showers to avoid picking up athlete’s foot. If you know you have a weaker immune system, you should also be sure to use caution around these types of environments.

Those who are affected by athlete’s foot may experience symptoms such as cracking, dryness, flakiness, itchiness, redness, or scaliness of the skin of the foot or in between the toes. Oozing, crusting, swelling, and the formation of blisters are other symptoms that may arise due to athlete’s foot.

If athlete’s foot goes untreated, there is a high risk that it may spread from toe to toe. With this in mind, it’s highly recommended that you meet with a podiatrist for a professional diagnosis. Your podiatrist can give you information about treatment options that best suit your case.

Brachymetatarsia (Short Toe Lengthening)

Brachymetatarsia is a condition in which one of the five long bones of the foot (the metatarsals) is abnormally short, resulting in a shortened toe. This condition usually occurs in both feet (i.e., bilaterally) and in the fourth toe. If it affects more than one toe, the condition is called brachymetapody.

Causes Of Brachymetatarsia

In most cases, brachymetatarsia results when the metatarsal growth plate closes too early. Once the growth plate closes, the bone can no longer grow. This can be caused by a genetic factor or by trauma to the foot that results in a metatarsal growth plate fracture.

Physiology Of Brachymetatarsia

A shortened toe can cause several problems. During walking, the weight normally is transferred from the fifth toe to the fourth, then to the third, and so on until it reaches the first toe (hallux). This occurs because the toes are gradually longer and as weight is transferred to the forefoot, the next longest toe assumes the weight. Brachymetatarsia disrupts this process.

If the fourth toe is shorter than the fifth toe, it never assumes the body weight and cannot transfer it to the third toe correctly. As a result, the fifth and third toes receive extra weight and pain develops in those areas. An abnormally short toe also tends to drift upward, which often causes problems with footwear.

Bunions

A bunion is a bony, painful swelling that is often formed on the first joint of the big toe. Bunions can be extremely painful due to the weight of all your body resting on it each time you take a step. Everyday activities, such as walking and wearing shoes, can cause you extreme discomfort if you have a bunion.

Reasons that a person may develop a bunion can vary. Some patients may form bunions due to genetic factors, complications with arthritis, or a weak foot structure. General aging can also play a role in the formation of a bunion.

If you have a bunion, you may notice a bony bump on your big toe, experience swelling and redness, and the area may feel tender to the touch. To help alleviate the pain that often comes with having a bunion, it’s suggested to maintain a healthy weight to help lessen the pressure on your toe, practice both heating and icing the affected area, wear wide-fitting shoes wear to leave plenty of space for your toes and to minimize rubbing, and look into shoe inserts that can help position your foot correctly.

Because bunions can result in other painful foot problems, such as hammertoes and bursitis, we recommend that you meet with a podiatrist for a professional diagnosis and for information regarding all your treatment options.

Calluses

What Is A Callus?

A callus, also known as hyperkeratosis, is an area of hard, thickened skin that can occur across the ball of the foot, on the heel, or on the outer side of the big toe. Although many consider them a skin problem, they are indicative of a problem with the bone.

Calluses form from repeated friction and pressure, as the shoe (or ground) rubs against a bony prominence (bone spur) on the toe or foot. The skin thickens in response to this pressure. Small amounts of friction or pressure over long periods of time cause a corn or callus. A great deal of friction or pressure over shorter periods of time can cause blisters or open sores. Calluses typically develop under a metatarsal head (the long bone that forms the ball of the foot). Calluses have painful nerves and bursal sacs (fluid-filled balloons that act as shock absorbers) beneath them, causing symptoms ranging from sharp, shooting pain to dull, aching soreness.

How Do I Treat A Callus?

Calluses can be treated with over-the-counter callus removers, which use strong acids to peel this excess skin away after repeated application. Be careful using these products as they can cause chemical burns when misapplied or used in excess. Alternatively, treat calluses as follows: Begin by soaking the foot or feet in warm soapy water and gently rubbing away any dead skin that loosens. Next, use a pumice stone or emery board to file away the thickened skin. Apply a good moisturizer to the hardened areas to keep them softer and relieve pain. Nonmedicated corn pads or moleskin (a thin fuzzy sheet of fabric with an adhesive back) are available in stores and can relieve pain caused by calluses. However, use caution removing pads or moleskins to avoid tearing the skin.

A condition called Intractable Plantar Keratosis (IPK) is a deep callus directly under the ball of the foot. IPK is caused by a “dropped metatarsal,” which happens when the metatarsal head drops to a lower level than the surrounding metatarsals and protrudes from the bottom of the foot. This results in more pressure being applied in this area and causes a thick callus to form. A dropped metatarsal can either be a congenital abnormality, a result of a metatarsal fracture, or a structural change that may have occurred over time.

Corns

If you happen to wear tight fitting shoes or tend to stand for the majority of your day, it’s likely that you may develop a foot condition known as a corn. When frequent friction or pressure is put on the foot, a small, hardened lump may form in that area. A corn may have a yellow hue and can typically be found on the side of the toes, as well as on the bottom of the feet. Though they are generally harmless, corns can often bring many patients discomfort.

To help prevent yourself from developing a corn, it’s important to wear shoes that give your toes enough room to comfortably move around. Some patients may also find it useful to soak the feet with warm water, pat them dry, and apply a moisturizer. After practicing these steps over a period of time, the corn will most likely soften. Your podiatrist may choose to file the corn down.

For more information and professional removal of your corn, we recommend you consult with a podiatrist for an advised treatment plan.

Crush Injuries

Nearly one-fourth of all the bones in your body are in your feet. A broken (fractured) bone in your forefoot or in one of your toes is often painful, but rarely disabling. Most of the time, these injuries heal without operative treatment.

There are two types of foot fractures: stress fractures and general bone fractures. Stress fractures usually occur in the bones of the forefoot extending from the toes to the middle of the foot. Stress fractures are like tiny cracks in the bone surface. They can happen with sudden increases in exercise (such as running or walking for longer distances or times), improper training techniques, or a change in surfaces.

Most other types of fractures extend through the bone, and are called bone fractures. They may be stable, in which there is no shift in bone alignment, or displaced, in which the bone ends no longer line up properly. Bone fractures usually result from trauma, such as dropping a heavy object on your foot, or from a twisting injury. If the fractured bone does not break through the skin, it is called a closed fracture. If the fracture does break through the skin, it is called an open fracture.

Because of the complex structures in the foot, there are some other, more specific types of fractures that can occur. For example, the fifth metatarsal, known as the little or pinky toe, is susceptible to a variety of different fractures. The relationship between the ankle and the foot can be compromised by an ankle-twisting injury, which may tear the tendon that attaches to this bone and pull a small piece of the bone away. A more serious injury in the same area is known as a Jones fracture, which occurs near the base of the bone and disrupts its blood supply. This injury may take longer to heal or require surgery.

Common symptoms for any type of foot fracture includes pain, swelling, and sometimes bruising. Be sure to seek medical attention for any suspected foot fracture.

Diabetic Foot Care

Unfortunately, foot problems are often a common result of having diabetes. As time goes by, it’s likely that diabetes can cause nerve damage, also known as diabetic neuropathy. This can lead to tingling or a painful sensation, and it may also cause you to lose feeling in your feet. The loss of feeling in your feet can become incredibly dangerous, especially if you can longer sense a blister or cut on your foot; this can lead to sores or infections.

There are many ways to maintain healthy foot care when dealing with diabetes. Most importantly, you want to ensure that you’re managing your blood glucose levels, otherwise known as your blood sugar. You also want to ensure that you’re checking your feet daily. As mentioned before, it’s important to recognize if your feet have cuts, sores, blisters, plantar warts, ingrown toenails, or other troubling foot conditions to stay ahead of the issue and prevent yourself from further harm. Along with foot checks, you should also wash and dry your feet daily using lukewarm water. It may also be useful in certain cases to moisturize your feet a few times a week, especially if you’re prone to dryness. Please be advised, however, to avoid moisturizing between the toes as they will not dry properly. Another rule you may want to follow is to ensure you’re cutting your toenails straight across. You should also refrain from digging into the sides of the toes; this will help prevent the development of an ingrown toenail. If you do happen to develop a corn or callus, never treat them yourself; seek the help of a professional. It may also be beneficial to look into socks made specifically for those with diabetes to help provide yourself with extra cushion. You may also want to refrain from walking barefoot, as well as avoid smoking, as it restricts the blood flow to your feet.

In certain serious cases, you may notice a cut, blister, or bruise is not healing after a few days. If this occurs, it’s important to seek the help of a professional. Other warning signs include redness, swelling, a callus with dried blood inside of it, or an infection that causes discoloration of the foot and an odor.

If you’d like more information on how to maintain healthy feet while living with diabetes, seek the assistance of a podiatrist who can provide you with the tips needed for healthy foot care.

Extracorporeal Shock Wave For Heel Pain

Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy (ESWT) is used to treat chronic heel pain (plantar fasciitis). “Extracorporeal” means “outside of the body.” During this noninvasive procedure, sonic waves are directed at the area of pain using a device similar to that currently used in nonsurgical treatment of kidney stones.

Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy is prescribed for patients who have experienced plantar fasciitis for an extended period of time — six months or more — and have not benefited from other conservative treatments. The brief procedure lasts about 30 minutes and is performed under local anesthesia and/or “twilight” anesthesia. Strong sound waves are directed at and penetrate the heel area to stimulate a healing response by the body. ESWT is performed on an outpatient basis. Although there are no bandages, someone will need to drive the patient home.

People who are not candidates for ESWT include pregnant women and individuals with neurological foot disease, vascular foot disease, pacemakers, or people taking medications that interfere with blood clotting (such as Coumadin).

This therapy is a safe and effective alternative treatment for heel pain and only requires a short recovery time. Clinical studies show a 70 percent success rate for treatment of plantar fasciitis using Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy.

Flat Feet

Flat feet is a condition that affects those who have little to no arch in their feet. When you stand, a person who doesn’t have flat feet will have a gap from the inner part of their feet to the floor, due to the normal arch that slightly rises off the ground. Those with flat feet will experience no such gap. While there are some people who experience no issues with their flat feet, it’s not uncommon for those with this condition to experience discomfort or pain.

Flat feet may cause a certain level of pain due to strained muscles and connecting ligaments. Those not afflicted by flat feet are able to get support while walking by the spring that the arch provides, which in turn, helps to distribute your body weight while taking steps. When the arch is no longer present, there is a larger amount of pressure on your muscles and ligaments in the feet, which is why they become strained and may cause you to feel pain.

There are many reasons that play a role in why a person may develop flat feet. For instance, certain genetic factors passed down from parents can lead to flat feet. Children may appear to have flat feet; however, their arches should develop over time. Having overall weak arches, a foot or ankle injury, arthritis, or a muscle or nervous system disease may all increase your likelihood of having flat feet. Tarsal coalition, a foot condition causing the fusion of bones in the feet, may also play a part in developing flat feet. Other common factors that are linked to flat feet include diabetes and obesity.

To manage the discomfort that may come with flat feet, we recommend that your practice exercises to help ease your pain. Heel cord stretches are a great way to stretch your Achilles tendon and help loosen up calf muscles that are often strained due to flat feet. Placing a golf ball under your foot and rolling it back and forth while seated is another great stretch, especially for your plantar fascia ligament.

When it comes to treating flat feet or fallen arches, it’s suggested you get plenty of rest. Frequently ice the affected area to help reduce swelling. Performing daily stretches are a great way to loosen up your muscles and relieve strain. It may also be beneficial to look into orthotics or shoe inserts to help relieve the pain.

If you’d like more information on how to treat discomfort you’re feeling because of flat feet, consult with a podiatrist for the best treatment options for your case.

Flat Foot Correction

Adult-acquired flatfoot or posterior tibial tendon dysfunction usually leads to a gradual loss of the arch. The posterior tibial muscle is a deep muscle in the back of the calf and has a long tendon that extends from above the ankle and attaches into several sites around the arch of the foot. The muscle acts like a stirrup on the inside of the foot to help support the arch. The posterior tibial muscle stabilizes the arch and creates a rigid platform for walking and running. If the posterior tibial tendon becomes damaged or tears, the arch loses its stability and as a result, collapses, causing a flatfoot.

Surgery is often performed to give the patient a more functional and stable foot. Several procedures may be required to correct a flatfoot deformity, depending on the severity of the problem. These may include:

Tenosynovectomy – a procedure to clean away (debridement) and remove any of the inflamed tissue around the tendon.
Osteotomy – removal of a portion of the heel bone (calcaneus) to move the foot structure back into alignment.
Tendon Transfer – in which replacement fibers from another tendon are inserted to help repair damage.
Lateral Column Lengthening – A procedure that implants a small piece of bone, usually removed from the hip, outside of the heel bone to create the proper bone alignment and rebuild the arch.
Arthrodesis – Fusing of one or more bones together to eliminate any joint movement, which stabilizes the foot and prevents any further deterioration or damage.

Foot and Ankle Surgery

When it comes to receiving foot and ankle surgery, it’s typically a case by case situation. Some factors that play a role in whether or not you need surgery include the severity of your symptoms as well as your response to other conservative, noninvasive treatment methods.

There are a number of different foot and ankle conditions that may benefit from surgery as a treatment option. Bunions, hammertoe, metatarsal, ankle arthritis, Achilles tendon disorders, Morton’s neuroma, tibialis posterior disorder, and plantar fasciitis are all conditions that may require surgery as a treatment option, depending on their severity. Long-lasting pain relief is typically the biggest takeaway from having surgery performed to remedy your condition.

In order to best prepare for surgery, make sure you have a consultation with your podiatrist about your overall health, discuss any possible changes in medication, and ask any questions you may have about the procedure to go into the treatment with a clear head. In some cases, you may have to refrain from eating and drinking a few hours before the procedure, so make sure you understand what must be done on your end beforehand.

As for recovery, again, this will typically vary case by case and will be dependent on your condition and the type of surgery performed. Generally, it’s recommended that you get plenty of rest, ice the affected area, compress the wound to aid in further strain, and keep the area elevated to reduce any possible swelling. In some cases, your podiatrist may encourage you to use bandages, splints, surgical shoes, casts, crutches, orthotics, or a cane, depending on how much weight they believe your foot and ankle can bear.

If you’d like to determine whether surgery is the best option for you and your foot condition, consult with a podiatrist who will be able to give you a proper diagnosis and aid you with your decision.

Foot Orthotics

Orthotics, unlike typical shoe inserts, are prescribed by a podiatrist to help provide your feet with cushion and support. They can also aid in correcting a specific foot condition that you may be dealing with. Conditions such as diabetes, plantar fasciitis, bursitis, arthritis, and flat feet can highly benefit from the use of orthotics, and orthotics may assist you in alleviating pain that often comes with those ailments.

Orthotics can come in many different shapes and sizes and can be made from different types of materials. The purpose of a custom orthotic is for it to match your specific needs. Some orthotics may be rigid or functional, while others are soft and accommodative. Rigid orthotics are made to help ease foot aches and strains, and they’re made from harder materials like plastic or carbon fiber. Soft orthotics serve to take the pressure off of uncomfortable areas of the feet, such as sores or foot ulcers. This type of orthotic is typically made from soft, compression materials.

Custom orthotics are made to mold to your feet and should fit your shoes perfectly. If you feel like the orthotic isn’t fitted properly, it’s extremely important you let your podiatrist know right away so they can assist in getting you as comfortable as possible.

In order to ensure your orthotic is doing its job, it’s recommended that you keep a healthy line of communication with your podiatrist and visit at their requested schedule. Doing this will keep track of gradual improvement and will allow you to discuss any possible adjustments needed. If you feel orthotics are a treatment option for you, we recommend you meet with a podiatrist for a proper diagnosis and to discuss how to improve your foot health.

Foot Pain

The feet serve as the foundation of the body. When pain is experienced, it’s therefore extremely important to identify early on what and where the issue is. The causes of foot pain vary greatly, including but not limited to diseases, deformities, improper footwear, and injuries pertaining to the foot region.

Those who experience foot pain may also notice redness, swelling, soreness, bruising, or numbness present at the injured area. When these symptoms occur, it’s important to also identify where the pain experienced is located, as there are a number of foot complications that could be at the root of the problem. For example, different foot conditions can affect different areas such as the heel, ball of the foot, foot arch, the toes, or ankles, to name a few.

Common heel pain conditions include heel spurs and heel fractures. Morton’s neuroma is a condition that often comes with pain experienced at the ball of the foot, as well as sesamoiditis. Those suffering from discomfort in their arches may have flat feet or plantar fasciitis. Common issues that affect the toes include gout, bunions, blisters, corns and calluses, as well as hammertoe and ingrown toenail. An ankle sprains is also a common ailment that can lead to foot pain.

Treatment for foot pain varies for each case, depending on both the cause of pain and the location of the affected area. The most common recommendations for easing the discomfort of foot pain include the following: getting plenty of rest, icing and heating the area in which pain is felt, pain relievers, and keeping the foot elevated to avoid swelling.

If you’re experiencing foot pain, we recommend that you meet with a podiatrist as soon as possible for a proper diagnosis and suggested treatment plan.

Fungal Toenails

The area of the toes is generally warm and damp, unfortunately making it a great area for fungus to grow. If left untreated, the fungal infection can spread, which is why it’s so important to get professional help early on and look into your treatment options.

Fungal infections occur due to fungus getting through the cracks of the toes or cuts in your skin. Common signs that you may have a fungal infection include thicker than normal toenails, oddly shaped toenails, discoloration, a yellowish hue to the nail, and separation of the nail and nail bed. Fungal infections can affect anyone but are most common among men, those with diabetes or athlete’s foot, and smokers. The risk of having toenail fungus also increases as you age, if another family member has it, and if you have a weaker immune system.

To avoid getting a fungal infection, it’s important that you wash your feet daily with soap and water, making sure to get in between your toes, and dry the feet well. When cutting your toenails, make sure the clippers you’re using are clean and that you’re cutting straight across. It’s also important that you wear shoes in areas where fungus can thrive, such as wet public places like swimming pools or locker rooms.

If you believe you’re experiencing a fungal toenail infection, we recommend that you speak with a podiatrist as soon as possible for a proper diagnosis and suggested plan for treatment.

Geriatric Foot Care

As you age, it’s important to pay good attention to your overall health; this includes the well being of your feet. The feet are considered the foundation of the body; if their hygiene becomes at risk, it’s possible you can find yourself immobile and in pain. To avoid this, it’s recommended that senior citizens, in particular, take early action in maintaining the health of their feet.

Some of the most common foot conditions found among geriatric patients include heel pain, ingrown toenails, corns, calluses, bunions, dry skin, brittle nails, complications due to arthritis and diabetes, and fungal infections. In order to avoid these issues from arising, it’s recommended that you use a foot stool when seated to keep the feet elevated, dry your feet completely after washing, ensure your shoes and socks fit well and leave room for your toes, trim your toenails straight across on a regular basis, and that you keep your feet moisturized to avoid cracking of the skin.

It may also be helpful to look into footwear that provides your feet with extra support to avoid fallen arches and ingrown toenails, as well as to help you keep your balance while going about your daily activities. In more severe cases, depending on the foot condition you’re experiencing, some podiatrists may suggest custom orthotics or shoe inserts to help correct the alignment of your feet.

If you’re experiencing foot pain of any kind or would like more information on how to maintain healthy feet as you age, we recommend you speak with a podiatrist who can offer you professional advice and guidance.

Hammertoes

Hammertoes can be identified by an abnormal bend in the middle joint of the toe. This abnormal bending can lead to added pressure on the toe when wearing shoes. It can also cause pain or discomfort when walking or running. Because hammertoes typically worsen overtime and become increasingly more rigid, it’s recommended that you seek the help of a podiatrist for treatment options if you believe you’re experiencing the symptoms of this deformity.

Those experiencing hammertoe may also find other foot related issues that come with this condition, such as corns or calluses. Some factors that may influence your likelihood of getting hammertoe include old age, toe length, improper footwear, and genetics. Those who have diabetes or arthritis are also more likely to have foot related complications, including hammertoe.

To help better prevent yourself from getting hammertoe, it’s recommended that you avoid wearing shoes that limit the room for your toes. Footwear with low heels, as well as adjustable straps or laces, can be useful when it comes to providing your feet with ample room to move. Buying shoes that fit are also important, which is why we recommend shopping at the end of the day when your feet are at their largest. This helps you avoid choosing a shoe too small for your feet.

Orthotics, as well as medical pads for corns and calluses that may develop due to your hammertoe, are recommended to help relieve discomfort. Light toe exercises may also be helpful for strengthening the muscles and mobility of your toes.

For a proper diagnosis and recommended treatment plan, we suggest you consult with a podiatrist for professional help and care.

Heel Pain

Heel pain, while quite common, can be extremely uncomfortable and painful if not met with proper care or treatment. Heel pain may occur if you injure or overuse the heel. If left uncared for, the affected area may worsen, limiting your mobility and making it difficult to perform everyday activities, such as walking.

There are many different causes of heel pain, including strains or sprains, tarsal tunnel syndrome, stress fractures, Achilles tendonitis, and heel bursitis. One of the most common causes of heel pain for children and teenagers specifically is Sever’s disease. Sever’s disease can develop due to overuse or repetitive microtrauma of the heel bone’s growth plates. This condition is often seen among those who are active in sporting activities.

Other causes of heel pain may include issues with poor circulation, poor posture when walking or running, a soft tissue mass, and a rupture of the Achilles tendon. To help ease the discomfort of heel pain, it’s advised that you get plenty of rest, apply ice to the affected area, and wear shoes that fit properly. In some more serious cases, a podiatrist might recommend the use of custom orthotics or shoe inserts for extra support.

If you’re experiencing heel pain, we recommend you consult with a podiatrist as soon as possible for a proper diagnosis and treatment plan.

Heel Spurs

Heel spurs are brought upon by a calcium deposit that causes a bony protrusion on the underside of the heel bone. It normally forms over time and can best be diagnosed through an x-ray examination. Heel spurs are commonly linked with plantar fasciitis, an inflammation that runs along the bottom of the foot. Common symptoms of heel spurs include pain towards the affected area, inflammation, and swelling at the front of the heel.

There are different causes that may lead to a heel spur including poorly fitted shoes, excess weight or obesity, repetitive stress from running or jogging on hard surfaces, and arthritis. Treating a heel spur often requires a lifestyle change as well as getting plenty of rest. Using cold compresses is another method to help alleviate the discomfort of a heel spur. To prevent further damage, it may be useful to look into wearing shoe inserts or custom orthotics.

Practicing different exercises can help reduce the pain of heel spurs as well decrease inflammation you may be experiencing. Some of these helpful exercises include calf stretches performed either against a wall or on steps, foot rolls with a golf or tennis ball, seated foot flexes, and towel grabs with your toes. Heel spur prevention can start by understanding the everyday stresses put on your feet and knowing when to let your feet rest. It’s also important to not let heel pain go uncared for. Once you notice something is off, take action instead of waiting to see if it goes away.

If you’d like more information about heel spurs, consult with a podiatrist who can provide you with a proper diagnosis and professional care.

Ingrown Toenails

Ingrown toenails can form when the side of a toenail begins to grow into the flesh surrounding the nail. As a result, the affected toe—most commonly the big toe—may become red, swollen, painful, and—in severe cases—infected.

There are many reasons why an ingrown toenail may develop. Improperly cutting your toenails is a major cause of ingrown toenails. If toenails aren’t cut straight across or are cut too short, the likelihood of getting an ingrown toenail may increase. Other causes include having unusually curved toenails, wearing shoes that don’t give your toes an ample amount of space, and hereditary factors. Injuring the toe by stubbing it or having an object fall on it may also lead to ingrown toenails. If left untreated, an ingrown toenail can lead to further complications with the foot.

If you are someone who has diabetes, it’s extremely important to remain mindful of ingrown toenail prevention, as minor cuts or simple scrapes can lead to serious complications. You can prevent ingrown toenails by ensuring toenails are straight across and at a moderate length, wearing shoes that fit properly, and checking feet daily for signs of foot issues.

Treatment for an ingrown toenail will vary on a case by case basis. One form of treatment requires lifting the ingrown nail and placing a splint or piece of cotton underneath. Another method for a more severe case would involve partially removing the nail. For cases that need extreme care, the nail itself and tissue would have to be removed.

If you’d like more information about ingrown toenails, we recommend you consult with a podiatrist who can give you a proper diagnosis and go over your treatment options.

Nail Problems

Black Toenails

Black or darkened toenails are essentially bruised nails and can result from a variety injuries or problems. Darkened nails may occur as a result of the toe hitting the end or the top of the shoe toe area. Sometimes, the bruise can lead to a fungal nail infection.

Treatment may include trimming the nail back and applying a topical antifungal medication. If

the skin under the nail is ulcerated, a topical antibiotic ointment should be applied.

Diabetic patients should contact our office for evaluation if they experience any change in the color of toenails. The pressure causing the bruised nail may lead to a small sore under the toenail, which can lead to infection.

Nail Fungus

Many people don’t realize they have a fungal nail problem and, therefore, don’t seek treatment. Yet, fungal toenail infections are a common foot health problem and can persist for years without ever causing pain. The disease, characterized by a change in a toenail’s color, is often considered nothing more than a mere blemish. Left untreated, however, it can present serious problems.

Also referred to as onychomycosis, fungal nails are infections underneath the surface of the nail, which may also penetrate the nail. Fungal nail infections are often accompanied by a secondary bacterial and/or yeast infection in or about the nail plate, which ultimately can lead to difficulty and pain when walking or running. Symptoms may include discoloration, brittleness, loosening, thickening, or crumbling of the nail.

A group of fungi, called dermophytes, easily attack the nail and thrive on keratin, the nail’s protein substance. In some cases, when these tiny organisms take hold, the nail may become thicker, yellowish-brown, or darker in color, and foul smelling. Debris may collect beneath the nail plate, white marks may frequently appear on the nail plate, and the infection is capable of spreading to other toenails, the skin, or even the fingernails.

Nail bed injury may make the nail more susceptible to all types of infection, including fungal infection. Those who suffer chronic diseases, such as diabetes, circulatory problems, or immune-deficiency conditions, are especially prone to fungal nails. Other contributory factors may be a history of Athlete’s Foot or excessive perspiration.

Ingrown Toenails

Ingrown toenails, also known as onychocryptosis, is usually caused by trimming toenails too short, particularly on the sides of the big toes. They may also be caused by shoe pressure (from shoes that are too tight or short), injury, fungus infection, heredity, or poor foot structure. Ingrown toenails occur when the corners or sides of the toenail dig into the skin, often causing infection. A common ailment, ingrown toenails can be painful. Ingrown toenails start out hard, swollen, and tender. Left untreated, they may become sore, red, and infected and the skin may start to grow over the ingrown toenail.

In most cases, treating ingrown toenails is simple: soak the foot in warm, soapy water several times each day. Avoid wearing tight shoes or socks. Antibiotics are sometimes prescribed if an infection is present. Note: Please consult your physician before taking any medications. In severe cases, if an acute infection occurs, surgical removal of part of the ingrown toenail may be needed. Known as partial nail plate avulsion, the procedure involves injecting the toe with an anesthetic and cutting out the ingrown part of the toenail.

Ingrown toenails can be prevented by:

  • Trimming toenails straight across with no rounded corners.
  • Ensuring that shoes and socks are not too tight.
  • Keeping feet clean at all times.


You Can Prevent Fungal Nail Infections By Taking These Simple Precautions:

  • Exercise proper hygiene and regularly inspect your feet and toes.
  • Keep your feet clean and dry.
  • Wear shower shoes in public facilities whenever possible.
  • Clip nails straight across so that the nail does not extend beyond the tip of the toe.
  • Use a quality foot powder (talcum, not cornstarch) in conjunction with shoes that fit well and are made of materials that breathe.
  • Avoid wearing excessively tight hosiery, which promotes moisture. Socks made of synthetic fiber tend to “wick” away moisture faster than cotton or wool socks, especially for those with more active lifestyles.
  • Disinfect home pedicure tools and don’t apply polish to nails suspected of infection.

Depending on the type of infection you have, over-the-counter liquid antifungal agents may not prevent a fungal infection from recurring. A topical or oral medication may need to be prescribed, and the diseased nail matter and debris removed, a process called debridement. Note: Please consult your physician before taking any medications.

In severe cases, surgical treatment may be required to remove the infected nail. Permanent removal of a chronically painful nail, which has not responded to any other treatment, permits the fungal infection to be cured and prevents the return of a deformed nail.

Nerve Testing

Sudomotor Function Assessment:

Nerve Conduction Velocity (NCV) Test

What Is It?

A nerve conduction velocity test, also called a nerve conduction study, measures how quickly electrical impulses move along a nerve.

A healthy nerve conducts signals with greater speed and strength than a damaged nerve. The speed of nerve conduction is influenced by the myelin sheath — the insulating coating that surrounds the nerve.

Most neuropathies are caused by damage to the nerve’s axon rather than damage to the myelin sheath surrounding the nerve. The nerve conduction velocity test is used to distinguish between true nerve disorders (such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease) and conditions where muscles are affected by nerve injury (such as carpal tunnel syndrome).

Why Should I Do It?

This test is used to diagnose nerve damage or dysfunction and confirm a particular diagnosis. It can usually differentiate injury to the nerve fiber (axon) from injury to the myelin sheath surrounding the nerve, which is useful in diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

How Is It Performed?

During the test, flat electrodes are placed on the skin at intervals over the nerve that is being examined. A low intensity electric current is introduced to stimulate the nerves.

The velocity at which the resulting electric impulses are transmitted through the nerves is determined when images of the impulses are projected on an oscilloscope or computer screen. If a response is much slower than normal, damage to the myelin sheath is implied. If the nerve’s response to stimulation by the current is decreased but with a relatively normal speed of conduction, damage to the nerve axon is implied.

How Will It Feel?

There is generally minimal discomfort with the test because the electrical stimulus is small and usually is minimally felt by the patient.


Quantitative Sensory Testing (QST)

What Is It?

Quantitative sensory testing (QST) is a method used to assess damage to the small nerve endings, which detect changes in temperature, and the large nerve endings, which detect vibration

Why Do It?

QST is used to diagnose and assess the severity of nerve damage, especially in the small nerve endings. It can also help determine if a neuropathy is responding to treatment. It is used to diagnose many different types of neuropathies, including peripheral neuropathies. It may also be used to identify where the nerves are damaged.

How Is It Performed?

QST uses a computer testing system to measure how the nerves involved react to vibration and changes in temperature. The test results are compared to a series of “normal” patients as well as to the patient’s unaffected side.

How Will It Feel?

Depending on the specific test, the patient will feel mild vibrations and hot and cold sensations. The procedure is non-invasive — no needles are used. Overall, little or no discomfort should be felt during the test.

Epidermal Nerve Fiber Density (ENFD) is a technology used by neurologists for over 15 years. This diagnostic modality takes advantage of the fact that most forms of peripheraly neuropathy progress in a distal to proximal fashion, beginning with the body’s smallest and most distal (foot) nerve twigs (C fibers and A delta fibers), and then progressing proximally. This is why our diabetic patients so often present with peripheral neuropathy in a “stocking-like” distribution, i.e. in the feet. Those patients that exhibit this form of neuropathy, without involvement of larger and more proximal nerves, are said to have small fiber peripheral neuropathy. If the pathological process moves to the larger nerves, the neuropathy becomes mixed.

In short, ENFD testing measures the amount of C-fibers and A-delta fibers via a 3mm punch biopsy of the skin. With this testing, the physicians at OCFA can determine the amount of damage present as well as determine the degenerative changes present which may be predicative of impending neuropathy even before symptoms begin.

Neuroma (Morton's)

Morton’s neuroma may develop when the tissue around one of the nerves leading to your foot begins to thicken. When this occurs, you may experience some discomfort as if you were standing on a pebble stuck in your shoe. Most symptoms will not appear outwardly and will be experienced in the form of a sharp, burning pain in the ball of the foot, as well as a stinging or burning feeling in the toes that may sometimes lead to numbness.

Some factors that contribute to the formation of Morton’s neuroma include wearing high heels or ill-fitting shoes that put extra pressure on your toes or the balls of your feet. There has also been a tie to the development of Morton’s neuroma and certain high-impact sporting activities. Activities you may want to avoid from participating in too frequently include both jogging and running. Too much repetitive trauma can cause a strain on the feet and increase the chances of developing a foot complication. Other sports that require the use of tightly worn shoes, such as skiing or rock climbing, may also increase your chances of getting Morton’s neuroma. Certain foot deformities can also lead to the development of Morton’s neuroma. Some of these deformities that increase the likelihood of getting this condition include bunions, hammertoes, and flat feet.

Treatment for Morton’s Neuroma will often vary, depending on the severity of a patient’s condition. In some cases, injections may be helpful for alleviating pain. Another form of treatment is decompression surgery, in which a podiatrist will work to alleviate the pressure on the nerve. In more severe cases, full removal of the nerve would be required.

If you’d like more information about Morton’s neuroma, we suggest you consult with a podiatrist for a proper diagnosis and recommended treatment plan.

Plantar Fasciitis

Plantar fasciitis affects the plantar regions of the foot, namely the heel, arch, and midfoot. When too much stress is put on the plantar fascia, or the connective tissue that stretches from the heel to the ball of your foot, inflammation, overtightening, and tearing may arise. This can cause foot pain. Because of plantar fasciitis, you may experience tearing with the first steps you take in the morning each day.

A certain trigger that may cause stress to the plantar fascia includes poor arch support, which is brought upon by frequently walking barefoot or wearing shoes with improper arch support. Other causes include obesity or a sudden increase in weight, increased physical activity, weak foot and ankle muscles, tight calf muscles, and arthritis.

If you’re feeling pain after sitting, walking, or standing for a long period of time, as well as when you first step out of bed or climb stairs, you may be showing signs of plantar fasciitis. To know for sure what’s causing you pain, it’s best that you get an x-ray taken of your foot.

Because plantar fasciitis is known to worsen over time, it’s recommended that you meet with a podiatrist as soon as possible for a proper diagnosis and advised treatment plan.

Plantar Warts

Plantar warts are growths that typically appear on the heels or other weight-bearing areas of the feet. These warts are caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). The virus enters the body through breaks in the skin, such as cuts, that are on the bottom of the feet. Plantar warts are more likely to affect children and teenagers, people with weakened immune systems, people who have a history with plantar warts, and people who walk barefoot in environments exposed to a wart-causing virus.

If you suspect you have plantar warts, you may have the following symptoms: pain or tenderness while walking, a lesion that interrupts the ridges in the skin of your foot, small fleshy lesions on the bottom of the foot, or a callus where a wart has grown inward over a well-defined spot on the skin.

HPV causes plantar warts to form and is very common. There are more than 100 kinds of the virus in existence. However, only a few of them cause warts on the feet. The other types of HPV are likely to cause warts on other parts of the body.

If you have plantar warts, your podiatrist may try different treatment methods depending on your specific case. Some treatments for plantar warts are peeling medicines (salicylic acid), freezing medicines (cryotherapy), or surgical procedures. Laser treatments and vaccines are also used to treat plantar warts.

Shin Splint

Whether you’re a runner, an athlete or just want to regularly exercise, you might experience pain in your legs. If you have felt sharp pains in your lower extremities, then you may suffer from shin splints. And while it is a common complaint, shin splints shouldn’t go ignored.

What Are The Causes Of Shin Splints?

Shin splints typically occur from repeated pounding on hard surfaces during activities such as running, basketball or tennis. You can also get them when you change to your running or workout shoes. They can even occur when you wear your shoes too long and they become worn out. When transitioning from a trail to concrete or asphalt while running or walking, you may develop shin splints. Working out harder than usual or by training too hard without gradually working up to a training level can also cause shin splints.

What Are The Symptoms Of Shin Splints?

Pain on the front lower part of the leg is a common complaint of people who have shin splints and some may even have swelling as well. When you first notice the pain, it may just be at the start of your workout and feel like a dull ache or soreness. If left untreated, the pain can become sharper and last until you stop exercising. In some severe cases, the pain can continue even after you finish your workout.

Shin splints usually involve small tears in the leg muscles where they are attached to the shinbone. There are two types of shin splints: anterior and posterior shin splints. The pain usually develops gradually without a history of trauma and might begin as a dull ache or pain along the front or inside of the shin after running or even walking. Pain can become more intense if not addressed immediately and can put you at an increased risk of developing stress fractures.
Treatment And Prevention Of Shin Splints

Treatments for shin splints should include taking a break from exercise that is causing the problem until the pain subsides. Icing the area immediately after running or exercising can also be effective in addition to gentle stretching before and after training. Another option is to take aspirin or ibuprofen to relieve the pain and reduce inflammation.

The best way to prevent shin splints is to stretch before you run or exercise. By stretching, you are warming up and strengthening your muscles. Also, wear footwear that has good shock absorption and avoid running on hard surfaces or perform excessive running or jumping on the ball of the foot.

Make sure you don’t train through the pain of shin splints because it could cause further damage. If you are experiencing pain, it is important to seek the consultation of your podiatrist at the first on sight of shin splints or potential shin splints.

Sports Medicine

As with any sporting activity, it’s very important to be aware of the safety precautions needed to help avoid injury and reduce risk. With that being said, injuries of the foot and ankle are fairly common among those who actively participate in sports.

Some sports may be considered more dangerous in terms of foot and ankle injuries compared to others. These sports may include basketball, running, football, soccer, and dancing. Sports that require tightly worn shoes as well as have a particular focus on jumping typically run a higher risk of injury. Because the feet are considered the foundation of the body, help us stay balanced, and enable us to perform our everyday activities, professional help should be sought at the first instinct of something gone wrong.

Some common contributors that lead to foot and ankle injuries in the realm of sports include not stretching properly or failing to warm up, wearing the incorrect footwear needed for your particular sport, as well as not taping or providing your feet and ankle with the needed support. There are a number of foot conditions that can develop if certain safety measures are ignored. Some of the most common conditions related to sports injuries include Achilles tendinitis, plantar fasciitis, and stress fractures, to name a few.

Achilles tendinitis affects the largest tendon in the body, the Achilles tendon. This type of injury typically occurs because of overuse. The main function of the Achilles tendon is to transmit power from the calf muscles to the heel and the foot. When this tendon is harmed, it can be extremely painful and may lead to further complications including tears, ruptures, tendinitis, peritendinitis, tendinosis, tendinopathy, and bursitis.

Plantar fasciitis may occur when the band of tissues that support the arch of your foot experience too much stress. These tissues can become strained from frequently performing sporting activities, thus causing inflammation and pain at the bottom of the heel.

Stress fractures can arise due to a lack of conditioning, use of improper equipment or technique, and repetitive stress placed on the foot and ankle. A stress fracture is a small crack in the bone that can be very painful and cause a great deal of discomfort.

If you commonly participate in sporting activities and would like more information about how to keep your feet and ankles safe, as well as learn more about your treatment options if injured, we recommend you speak with a podiatrist for professional guidance and care.

Subtalar Implant For Flatfoot (Hyperpronation)

Minimal Incision For Correction Of Flatfoot (Hyperpronation)

Flatfoot (hyperpronation and flattening-out of the longitudinal arch) (also known as pes planus or pes planovalgus) is a common deformity among children and adults. Another cause of flatfoot can be attributed to posterior tibial tendon dysfunction. Conservative treatments to relieve pain from the foot and leg associated with flatfoot include orthotics, stretching exercises, and medication (e.g., non-steroidal anti-inflammatory

drugs). Corticosteroid injections continue to be controversial. These methods may fail to provide relief and do not provide any correction at the point of contact.
Your Internal Solution To Misaligned Feet

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Misaligned Feet? Your Body Will Tell You

Your feet are the foundation of your body.

When your feet are misaligned, your body will tell you through:

  • Chronic sore feet, heels, and ankles
  • Knee joint pain and shin splints
  • Hip joint pain
  • Back pain
Wound Care

Wound care is particularly important for those with diabetes. It’s possible that what appears to be a small wound could turn into more severe foot complications down the road if left untreated. It’s common for those with diabetes to experience neuropathy. Neuropathy is a type of nerve damage that affects the body and can cause you to lose feeling in the feet. If you’re no longer experiencing feeling in your feet and a wound develops, it’s very possible it may go unnoticed if you don’t check your feet daily.

Some factors that contribute to the formation of wounds on the feet include wearing tightly fitted shoes, getting a pebble stuck in your shoe, or simply walking. What may appear to be just a small inconvenience such as a blister or callus can worsen over time, so it’s important to be safe and seek the attention of a professional. If you’ve developed a wound, it’s recommended that you try your best to keep the weight off of the area until you’re able to meet with a podiatrist.

Some ways to prevent wounds from developing include checking your feet daily for any injuries, washing and drying your feet daily, dressing for comfort and making sure your toes have enough space, and properly trimming your toenails straight across. Because wounds can lead to more severe complications, especially for those with diabetes, we recommend you speak with a podiatrist for professional guidance and a suggested plan for treatment.